Netflix and Comcast strike deal to allow faster speeds

netflixia:

Netflix and Comcast have struck an arrangement to more directly connect their networks, Comcast announced Sunday.

A bit upset with this… can’t we all have faster speeds?

Bottom line: If you can’t spare some time to give your employees the chance to wow you, you’ll never get the best from them.

yasmary:

Pixar Animation Studios: Did Pixar accidentally delete Toy Story 2 during production?

And here you can read more about it:

http://www.quora.com/Pixar-Animation-Studios/Did-Pixar-accidentally-delete-Toy-Story-2-during-production/answer/Oren-Jacob

The Facebook-related firings have begun: A teacher’s aide in Michigan was let go from her job after a school administrator demanded that she turn over her Facebook password and she refused. The aide, Kimberly Hester, is preparing for a legal showdown with the school system.

discoverynews:

Bendable E-Reader Going Into Production

E-readers are a great tool, but the one big disadvantage is that they’re made of breakable glass and sensitive electronics that can get damaged when dropped. Books, by contrast, are pretty durable.

LG Display has brought flexible, light and tough e-readers a little closer to reality. The company announced that it is mass-producing a flexible electronic paper display, or EPD.

keep reading

soupsoup:

This American Life retracts Mike Daily episode regarding Apple + Foxconn, said it was “partially fabricated” 

Statement from Mike Daisey:

What I do is not journalism. The tools of the theater are not the same as the tools of journalism. For this reason, I regret that I allowed THIS AMERICAN LIFE to air an excerpt from my monologue. THIS AMERICAN LIFE is essentially a journalistic ­- not a theatrical ­- enterprise, and as such it operates under a different set of rules and expectations. But this is my only regret. I am proud that my work seems to have sparked a growing storm of attention and concern over the often appalling conditions under which many of the high-tech products we love so much are assembled in China.

fastcompany:

TED, the conference dedicated to “Ideas Worth Spreading,” took a step forward in its educational mission today by launching a TEDEd video channel on YouTube. Shorter than the 18-minute TED talks that have racked up 500 million views, these videos feature a combination of talking heads from TED stages and animation (artwork by Fast Company Most Creative Person Sunni Brown, among others) tackling topics like neuroscience and evolution for a high-school-aged audience.

Learn more->

Exciting!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

discoverynews:

First Test-Tube Hamburger Ready This Fall

The world’s first “test-tube” meat, a hamburger made from a cow’s stem cells, will be produced this fall, Dutch scientist Mark Post told a major science conference on Sunday.

Post’s aim is to invent an efficient way to produce skeletal muscle tissue in a laboratory that exactly mimics meat, and eventually replace the entire meat-animal industry.

keep reading

THE GIST

reuters:

Disturbing development at Twitter: countries will silence tweets

theatlantic:

Why the iPhone Isn’t Building a New U.S. Middle Class

Short answer: it’s not just wages. The vastly different wages paid to American workers, compared to contemporaries in Taiwan or China, is a significant factor in the shift of massive supply chain operations in the tech industry over to Asia, The New York Times says in its in-depth examination of Apple and its suppliers.

Takeaway factoid someone will repeat in your earshot this week: manufacturing the iPhone in the United States would add about $65 to the cost of each unit. Is that worth it?

But it’s not just about the wages. The biggest shocks of the paper’s examination of Foxconn, one of Apple’s major suppliers for the iPhone, are about physical scale, not payscale. The plant known as Foxconn City employes some 230,000 workers, with more than one quarter of them living on-site in company-built dormitories, The Times reports. The kitchens that feed the workers churn out 13 tons of rice per day, and guards work the hallways to prevent workers from trampling one another.

And the most chilling assessments of the U.S. labor market’s inability to share in some of this new manufacturing activity speak to simple inability to compete. Read more.

✑credit